Unexplained bleeding as a presentation of Munchausen syndrome: A case report

Authors

  • Fatima Zohra Department of Psychiatry, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
  • Maheen Rahman Department of Psychiatry, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh https://orcid.org/0009-0003-3573-7061
  • Rasheda Nasrin Lopa Department of Psychiatry, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh
  • Shawkat Ara Jahan Department of Psychiatry, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka, Bangladesh

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bsmmuj.v17i1.70450

Keywords:

Factitious disorder, Unexplained bleeding, Munchausen Syndrome

Abstract

Physicians sometimes face difficulty identifying underlying diseases of some signs and symptoms created by individuals intentionally but without any apparent practical gain. This case report presents the clinical profile of a woman aged 22 years with a history of recurrent bleeding from the oral cavity since childhood, which has recently been worsened and now involves bleeding from the nose, eye, ear, and umbilicus. However, no physical or laboratory abnormalities could be identified. She had mental trauma in her childhood. After a comprehensive assessment that included a medical history, observation, physical examination, and psychiatric evaluation, she was diagnosed with Munchausen syndrome, which is a psychological condition where people pretend to be ill or deliberately produce symptoms of illness in themselves. She was treated with pharmacotherapy and psychotherapy and discharged from the hospital bleeding-free, which persisted till several follow-up visits. 

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References

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Published

2024-02-07

How to Cite

Zohra, F. ., Rahman, M., Lopa, R. N., & Jahan, S. A. (2024). Unexplained bleeding as a presentation of Munchausen syndrome: A case report. Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University Journal, 17(1), e70450. https://doi.org/10.3329/bsmmuj.v17i1.70450

Issue

Section

Case Report