Genetic Imprinting: Comparative Analysis Between Plants and Mammals

  • Oluwaseun Ogunwuyi Department of Biology, Howard University, 415 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059
  • Ankur Upadhyay Department of Biology, Howard University, 415 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059
  • Simeon K Adesina Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Howard University
  • Reema Puri Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Howard University
  • Tasha M Foreman Department of Biology, Howard University, 415 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059
  • Belinda R Hauser Department of Microbiology, Howard Medical School, Howard University
  • Juanita Cox Department of Biology, Howard University, 415 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059
  • Eric Afoakwah Department of Biology, Howard University, 415 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059
  • Andre Porter Department of Biology, Howard University, 415 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059
  • Emma Annan Department of Biology, Howard University, 415 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059
  • Cheu Manka Department of Biology, Howard University, 415 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059
  • Denloye Olatilewa Department of Biology, Howard University, 415 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059
  • Bethtrice Thompson Department of Biology, Howard University, 415 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059
  • Peter R Kibanyi Department of Biology, Howard University, 415 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059
  • Kimberly Miller Department of Biology, Howard University, 415 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059
  • Hemayet Ullah Department of Biology, Howard University, 415 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059

Abstract

Genetic imprinting: the parent of origin?specific biased expression of alleles is an important type of epigenetic gene regulation in flowering plants and mammals. All imprinted genes show either maternal ? or paternal?specific mono?allelic expression. Considering that plants and mammals shared a common ancestor more than one billion years ago, significant overlap and potentially equally significant differences in the genomic imprinting mechanisms in these two taxa are emerging. In plants, the imprinted genes are primarily imprinted in the ephemeral endosperm tissues of the seeds which do not contribute any genome to future generations, while in mammals, the imprinted genes are located in embryo, placenta, and the adult body. Though both kingdoms silence imprinted genes using DNA methylation, imprinted alleles in mammals are targeted for silencing while in plants preexisting methylation is specifically removed from the allele destined to be active in maternally expressed genes in the endosperm. It is now accepted that imprinting evolved in both taxa due to competition between parental genomes over resource allocation to offspring. Moreover, the distinct life cycle stages between the taxa may account for the different strategies used by plants and mammals to regulate parent?specific gene expression. The elucidation of the genetic basis and molecular mechanisms responsible for genetic imprinting have provided answers to various crucial questions arising in biological sciences

Plant Tissue Cult. & Biotech. 26(2): 267-284, 2016 (December)

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Author Biography

Oluwaseun Ogunwuyi, Department of Biology, Howard University, 415 College St., NW, Washington, DC 20059


Published
2016-12-10
How to Cite
Ogunwuyi, O., Upadhyay, A., Adesina, S., Puri, R., Foreman, T., Hauser, B., Cox, J., Afoakwah, E., Porter, A., Annan, E., Manka, C., Olatilewa, D., Thompson, B., Kibanyi, P., Miller, K., & Ullah, H. (2016). Genetic Imprinting: Comparative Analysis Between Plants and Mammals. Plant Tissue Culture and Biotechnology, 26(2), 267-284. https://doi.org/10.3329/ptcb.v26i2.30576
Section
Review Paper