Screening of antibiotic resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria isolated from tiny freshwater shrimp (Macrobrachium lanchesteri) and “Kung Ten”, the uncooked Thai food

  • Kanittada Thongkao Department of Applied Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University, Bangkok 10300, Thailand
  • Yuttana Sudjaroen Department of Applied Science, Faculty of Science and Technology, Suan Sunandha Rajabhat University, Bangkok 10300, Thailand
Keywords: AmpC genes; β-lactamase; ESBLs; Kung Ten; Macrobrachium lanchesteri; tiny freshwater shrimp

Abstract

Objective: This study aimed to isolate and identify of pathogenic bacteria in tiny freshwater shrimp (Macrobrachium lanchesteri) and in Kung Ten, which is an unusual Thai cuisine that eaten alive shrimp directly. Antimicrobial susceptibility test and identification of antibiotic resistance genes for isolated bacteria were conducted.

Materials and Methods: Eighty of fresh shrimp samples and forty of Kung Ten salads were collected from four fresh markets, which were located in Bangkok and Nonthaburi province (N = 120). The isolation, identification, and antimicrobial susceptibility test of pathogenic bacteria were done following the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. Antibiotic-resistant bacteria were screened for β-lactamase relating genes, such as AmpC (MOX and ACC genes), blaCTX-M, and Int1 genes.

Results: The number of bacterial isolates in tiny freshwater shrimp and Kung Ten salad was 136 and 65, respectively. Aeromonas caviae, A. hydrophilla, Proteus penneri, Proteus vulgaris, and Klebsiella pneumoniae were commonly found. Ampicillin, amoxicillin/clavulanic, cefuroxime, tet­racycline, and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole resistance were observed, and common antibiot­ic-resistant bacteria were A. caviae, P. vulgaris, Enterobacter Aerogenes, and K. pneumoniae. A. caviae, P. penneri, K. Pneumoniae, and A. hydrophilla were positive for MOX gene; blaCTX-M, and Int1 genes; ACC and Int1 genes; and ACC gene, respectively.

Conclusion: Raw or uncooked shrimps in Kung Ten salad may a risk in foodborne diseases due to positive for pathogenic bacterial isolates. However, hygienic control on food preparation is diffi­cult to apply because of the difficulty of changing in local Thai food behavior.

J. Adv. Vet. Anim. Res., 7(1): 83-91, March 2020

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Published
2020-03-12
How to Cite
Thongkao, K., & Sudjaroen, Y. (2020). Screening of antibiotic resistance genes in pathogenic bacteria isolated from tiny freshwater shrimp (Macrobrachium lanchesteri) and “Kung Ten”, the uncooked Thai food. Journal of Advanced Veterinary and Animal Research, 7(1), 83-91. Retrieved from https://www.banglajol.info/index.php/JAVAR/article/view/46368
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Original Articles