Management Issues with Infection Control during Trauma Resuscitation in the Era of COVID-19: South African Experience.

Authors

  • Timothy Craig Hardcastle Trauma and Burns Service, Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital, Mayville, Durban, Dept of Surgery, Nelson R Mandela School of Clinical Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Congella, Durban, Head: Trauma and Burns, KwaZulu- Natal Dept of Health, Emergency Care, Faculty of Health Sciences, Durban University of Technology, Durban
  • Daniel Den Hollander Trauma and Burns Service, Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital, Mayville, Durban and Dept of Surgery, Nelson R Mandela School of Clinical Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Congella, Durban
  • Feroz Ganchi Trauma and Burns Service, Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital, Mayville, Durban and Dept of Surgery, Nelson R Mandela School of Clinical Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Congella, Durban
  • Shanisa Naidoo Trauma and Burns Service, Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital, Mayville, Durban and Dept of Surgery, Nelson R Mandela School of Clinical Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Congella, Durban
  • Thobekile Nomcebo Shangase Trauma and Burns Service, Inkosi Albert Luthuli Central Hospital, Mayville, Durban and Dept of Surgery, Nelson R Mandela School of Clinical Medicine, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Congella, Durban

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/bjms.v20i5.55410

Keywords:

Trauma; infection control; antimicrobial resistance; Covid-19; prevention management.

Abstract

Background: This invited short report aims to document the management of trauma and nontrauma ICU patients in one quaternary facility in South Africa during the first two waves of the SARS CoV2 (Covid-19) pandemic in Kwa Zulu-Natal.

Content: The setting of the trauma service and the changes made to ensure staff and patient safety are detailed. A brief overview of the clinical experience of caring for both trauma and non-trauma cases is provided along with the management of those cases who were found to be Covid-19 positive. The concerning aspect of increased antibiotic resistance development and the potential roles of antiseptic sanitisers is briefly discussed.

Conclusion: Trauma care is essential during the infectious pandemic and there is a risk of increased antibiotic resistance. Doing the basics “right” can prevent staff contamination or adverse patient outcomes.

Bangladesh Journal of Medical Science Vol.20(5) 2021 p.72-76

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Published

2021-09-05

How to Cite

Hardcastle, T. C. ., Hollander, D. D. ., Ganchi, F. ., Naidoo, S. ., & Shangase, T. N. . (2021). Management Issues with Infection Control during Trauma Resuscitation in the Era of COVID-19: South African Experience. Bangladesh Journal of Medical Science, 20(5), 72–76. https://doi.org/10.3329/bjms.v20i5.55410

Issue

Section

Review Article