Barriers and promotors in receptivity and utilization of feedback in a pre-clinical simulation based clinical training setting

  • Reina M Abraham Clinical and Professional Practice, School of Clinical Medicine, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000, South Africa
  • Veena S Singaram Clinical and Professional Practice, School of Clinical Medicine, College of Health Sciences, University of KwaZulu-Natal, Durban 4000, South Africa
Keywords: medical students; medical education; feedback; feedback receptivity; learner behaviour; responsibility sharing

Abstract

Objective: Many studies have explored feedback effectiveness using interventions focused on feedback delivery. It is equally important to consider how learners actively receive, engage with and interpret feedback. This study explores how medical students receive and use feedback in pre-clinical skills training.

Method: Focus group data from 25 purposively selected thirdyear medical students was thematically analysed. Four major themes and eight sub-themes related to the facilitators and barriers to feedback receptivity and utilisation to feed forward emerged from the data.

Results and Discussion: Students were receptive to feedback when its purpose and content aligned with their personal objectives, when it was consistent between tutors, and when it involved developing longitudinal relationships. The clinical skills formative logbook feedback culture with a learning focus was perceived to be predictive of their future performance and they were likely to take feedback on board, emphasising the role of reflection in this process. The depth and timing of actual feedback use varied among students, and language barriers hindered decoding feedback. Students’ self-regulatory focus on the feedback process had a dominant influence on their active use of feedback.

Conclusion: Incorporating learner behaviour underlying feedback use should be considered when designing interventions to promote feedback engagement, feedback literacy skills and responsibility sharing in the feedback process. Establishing a learning culture that promotes shared responsibility between clinical educators and learners enable greater control by learners over assessment and feedback processes and a commitment to behaviour change.

Bangladesh Journal of Medical Science Vol.20(3) 2021 p.594-607

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Abstract
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Published
2021-04-04
How to Cite
Abraham, R., & Singaram, V. (2021). Barriers and promotors in receptivity and utilization of feedback in a pre-clinical simulation based clinical training setting. Bangladesh Journal of Medical Science, 20(3), 594-607. https://doi.org/10.3329/bjms.v20i3.52802
Section
Original Articles