Discovery of potential cyclooxygenase inhibitors using in silico docking studies

  • Arumugam Madeswaran Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu
  • Muthuswamy Umamaheswari Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu
  • Kuppuswamy Asokkumar Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu
  • Thirumalaisamy Sivashanmugam Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu
  • Varadharajan Subhadradevi Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu
  • Puliyath Jagannath Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacy, Sri Ramakrishna Institute of Paramedical Sciences, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu
Keywords: Binding energy, Inhibition constant, Intermolecular energy, Cyclooxygenase

Abstract

This study deals with the evaluation of the cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity of flavonoids (tangeritin, morin, rhamnetin, theaflavin, pachypodol, eriodictyol, homoeriodictyol, aromadedrin, okanin) using in silico docking studies. In silico docking studies were carried out using AutoDock 4.2. Three important parameters like binding energy, inhibition constant and intermolecular energy were determined. The results showed that all the selected flavonoids showed binding energy ranging between -8.77 kcalmol-1 to -6.10 kcalmol-1 when compared with that of the standard (-8.30 kcalmol-1). Intermolecular energy (-10.56 kcalmol-1 to -7.89 kcalmol-1) and inhibition constant (373.91 nM to 34.03 µM) of the ligands also coincide with the binding energy. All the selected flavonoids contributed cyclooxygenase inhibitory activity because of its structural parameters. These molecular docking analyses could lead to the further development of potent cyclooxygenase inhibitors.

 

 

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Published
2012-03-26
How to Cite
Madeswaran, A., M. Umamaheswari, K. Asokkumar, T. Sivashanmugam, V. Subhadradevi, and P. Jagannath. “Discovery of Potential Cyclooxygenase Inhibitors Using in Silico Docking Studies”. Bangladesh Journal of Pharmacology, Vol. 7, no. 1, Mar. 2012, pp. 21-27, doi:10.3329/bjp.v7i1.10007.
Section
Research Articles