Severity of Migraine with or without comorbidities: A Comparative Study

Authors

  • Mohammad Akter Hossain Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology, National Institute of Neurosciences & Hospital, Sher-E-Bangla Nagar, Dhaka-1207
  • Quazi Deen Mohammad Professor, Department of Neurology, National Institute of Neurosciences and Hospital, Dhaka
  • Mansur Habib Professor, Department of Neurology, Dhaka Medical College, Dhaka
  • Md. Azharul Hoque Professor, Department of Neurology, National Institute of Neurosciences and Hospital, Dhaka
  • Md. Badrul Alam Professor, Department of Neurology, National Institute of Neurosciences and Hospital, Dhaka
  • Mohammad Enayet Hussain Assistant Professor, Department of Neurology, National Institute of Neurosciences and Hospital, Dhaka

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/jninb.v1i2.29835

Keywords:

Migraine, Severity, Comorbidities, MIGSEV

Abstract

Background: Migraine causes difficulties in daily life. Objective: The purpose of this present study was to assess the severity of migraine associated with comorbidities.

Methodology: This cross sectional study was carried out in Headache Clinic and Neurology outdoor in the Department of Neurology at Dhaka Medical College and Hospital (DMCH), Dhaka during the period of July 2010 to June 2011 for a period of one (01) year. All the patients presented with migraine were included as study population who were divided into two groups. Migraine patients without comorbidities were designated as group I and with comorbidities were in group II. The comorbidities were assessed which were both physical as well as psychiatric. The severity of migraine was assessed on the basis of four principal components like pain intensity, nausea, disability and tolerability.

Result: A total of 70 patients with migraine were recruited of which 37 patients were in group I and 33 patients were in group II. In group II major depressive disorder was in 8(24.3%) cases, generalized anxiety disorder was in 6(18.1%) cases and hypertensive was in 7(21.2%) cases. Among 8 major depressive disorder patients, mild, moderate and severe migraines were found in 1(3.03%) cases, 2(6.06%) cases and 5(15.15%) cases respectively. Out of 6 GAD patients, mild, moderate and severe migraine were found in 1(3.03%) case, 1(3.03%) case and 4(12.12%) cases. Seven patients were hypertensive of which 1(3.03) patient had mild, 2(6.06%) had moderate and 4(12.12%) had severe migraine. Mild migraine was found in 18(48.6%) patients in group I and 6(18.2%) patients in group II. Moderate migraine was found in 12(32.5%) patients and 8(24.2%) in group I and group II respectively. Severe migraine was found in 7(18.9%) patients in group I and 19(57.6%) patients in group II.

Conclusion: Severity of migraine is associated with different physical and psychiatric comorbidities. 

Journal of National Institute of Neurosciences Bangladesh, 2015;1(2): 33-36

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Abstract
880
PDF
739

References

Ropper AH, Samuels MA. Headache and other craniofacial pains. In: Adams and Victor Principles of Neurology, 9th ed. McGraw Hill, New York, 2009;162-188

Headache Classification Subcommittee of the International Headache Society. The international classification of headache disorders 2nd ed. Cephalalgia 2004; 24:1-160

Boes CJ, Capobianco DJ, Cutrer FM et al. Headache and other craniofacial pain. In: Bradley WG, Daroff RB, Fenichel GM,

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/b978-0-7506-7525-3.50111-4

Lipton RB, Diamond S, Stewart WF. Prevalence and burden of migraine in United States: data from the American Migraine Study II. Headache 2001; 41:646-57

http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1526-4610.2001.041007646.x

Buse DC, Manack A, Serrano D, Turkel C, Lipton RB. Sociodemographic and comorbidity profiles of chronic migraine and episodic migraine sufferers. J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 2009;81:428-432

http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/jnnp.2009.192492

Breslau N, Davis GC, Schultz LR, Paterson EL. Migraine and major depression: A longitudinal study. Headache 1994; 34:387-393

http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1526-4610.1994.hed3407387.x

Scher AI, Bigal ME, Lipton RB. Co-morbidity of migraine. Curr Opin Neurobiol 2005;18:305-310

http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/01.wco.0000169750.52406.a2

Livibond PF, Lovibond SH. The structure of negative emotional states: comparison of the Depression Anxiety Stress Scales

Chobanian AV, Bakris GL, Black HR, Cushman WC, Green LA, Izzo JL, et al. The Seventh Report of the Joint National Committee on Prevention, Detection, Evaluation and Treatment of High Blood Pressure. JAMA 2003; 289:2560-72

http://dx.doi.org/10.1001/jama.289.19.2560

Hanlon P, Byers M, Walker BR, Macdonald HM. Environmental and nutritional factors in disease. In: Colledge NR, Walker BR, Ralston SH, editors. Davidson's Principles & Practice of Medicine. 21st ed. Churchill Livingstone 2010;116-25

http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/B978-0-7020-3085-7.00005-5

Hasnaoui EI, Vray M, Richard A, Nachit-Ouinekh F, Boureau F, MIGSEV group. Assessing the severity of migraine: development of the MIGSEV scale. Headache 2003;43:628-635

http://dx.doi.org/10.1046/j.1526-4610.2003.03105.x

Habib M, Alam B, Hoque A, Hoque B, Mohammad QD. Headache study of 3350 cases. Bangladesh J Neurosci 2001;17(1):1-5

Headache Classification Subcommittee of the International Headache Society. International Classification of Headache Disorders 2nd edi. Cephalalgia 2004; 24:1-160

Bigal ME, Liberma JN, Lipton RB. Obesity and migraine. Neurology 2006;66:545-550

http://dx.doi.org/10.1212/01.wnl.0000197218.05284.82

Mathew NT. Migraine and hypertension. Cephalalgia 1999;19Suppl 25:17-9

http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0333102499019S2504

Downloads

Published

2017-04-06

How to Cite

Hossain, M. A., Mohammad, Q. D., Habib, M., Hoque, M. A., Alam, M. B., & Hussain, M. E. (2017). Severity of Migraine with or without comorbidities: A Comparative Study. Journal of National Institute of Neurosciences Bangladesh, 1(2), 33–36. https://doi.org/10.3329/jninb.v1i2.29835

Issue

Section

Original Research Articles