Decreased Morbidity and Mortality from Intestinal Ascariasis: Experience of a Single Center

Authors

  • Md. Akbar Hossain Bhuyian Chittagong Medical College Chittagong
  • Md. Abdullah Al Farooq Chittagong Medical College Chittagong
  • Md. Minhajuddin Sajid Chittagong Medical College Chittagong
  • MA Mushfiqur Rahman Chittagong Medical College Chittagong
  • Md. Momtazul Hoque Chittagong Medical College Chittagong
  • Khurshid Alam Sarwar Chittagong Medical College Chittagong
  • Tanvir Kabir Chowdhury Chittagong Medical College Chittagong
  • Mahfuzul Kabir Chittagong Medical College Chittagong
  • Tahmina Banu Chittagong Medical College Chittagong

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/jpsb.v2i2.19551

Keywords:

Ascariasis, Intestinal obstruction, Biliary Ascariasis

Abstract

Background: Ascariasis is a common gastrointestinal infestation worldwide. It affects more children who live in poor hygenic condition. Pediatric surgeons are supposed to manage related surgical complications of ascariasis.

Objective: To evaluate the recent pattern of occurrence of intestinal and biliary ascariasis with morbidity and mortality related to it.

Materials and Methods:

Study design: Retrospective study.

Period of study: Study was conducted between Jan 2006 - Dec 2011 (total 06 years).

Place of study: This study was carried out in the department of Pediatric Surgery, Chittagong Medical College Hospital (CMCH), Chittagong; Bangladesh.

Study Subjects: Patients admitted and diagnosed as intestinal (1591) and biliary (181) ascariasis in the department of Pediatric surgery, CMCH were evaluated.

Results: A total of 1772 patients were admitted with surgical complication of ascariasis. Among them 1591 (89.78%) patients were diagnosed as intestinal ascariasis and 181 (10.22%) patients as biliary ascariasis. Age range was 6 months to 12 years with mean age of 6 years for intestinal ascariasis. Biliary ascariasis presented between 3 years to 12 years with mean age of 7 years. Male (1060) suffered more than female (531). Male to female ratio was 2:1 for intestinal ascariasis while females (120)  suffered more than male(61) in biliary ascariasis ( ratio 2: 1). Total 231 surgery both elective and emergencies were done.

Discussion: Most of the patients (52-81% ) were treated by endoscopic removal of worm from common bile duct. Some patients (15 - 31 %) were treated successfully by conserevative approach. Only a few patients needed open surgical procedure. No patient had died from biliary ascariasis and death from complications of intestinal ascariasis reduced from 20% to 4% over the last 6 years.

Conclusion: There has been a reduced number of disease burden over the last few years from ascariatic and biliary ascariasis.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3329/jpsb.v2i2.19551

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Author Biographies

Md. Akbar Hossain Bhuyian, Chittagong Medical College Chittagong

Department of Pediatric Surgery

Md. Abdullah Al Farooq, Chittagong Medical College Chittagong

Department of Pediatric Surgery

Md. Minhajuddin Sajid, Chittagong Medical College Chittagong

Department of Pediatric Surgery

MA Mushfiqur Rahman, Chittagong Medical College Chittagong

Department of Pediatric Surgery

Md. Momtazul Hoque, Chittagong Medical College Chittagong

Department of Pediatric Surgery

Khurshid Alam Sarwar, Chittagong Medical College Chittagong

Department of Pediatric Surgery

Tanvir Kabir Chowdhury, Chittagong Medical College Chittagong

Department of Pediatric Surgery

Mahfuzul Kabir, Chittagong Medical College Chittagong

Department of Pediatric Surgery

Tahmina Banu, Chittagong Medical College Chittagong

Department of Pediatric Surgery

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Published

2014-07-16

How to Cite

Bhuyian, M. A. H., Farooq, M. A. A., Sajid, M. M., Rahman, M. M., Hoque, M. M., Sarwar, K. A., Chowdhury, T. K., Kabir, M., & Banu, T. (2014). Decreased Morbidity and Mortality from Intestinal Ascariasis: Experience of a Single Center. Journal of Paediatric Surgeons of Bangladesh, 2(2), 73–78. https://doi.org/10.3329/jpsb.v2i2.19551

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Section

Original Articles