Inhibitory and Bactericidal Potential of Crude Acetone Extracts of <i>Combretum molle</i> (Combretaceae) on Drug-resistant Strains of <i>Helicobacter pylori</i>

Authors

  • Collise Njume Microbial Pathogenicity and Molecular Epidemiology Research Group, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Science and Agriculture, University of Fort Hare
  • Anthony J Afolayan Phytomedicine Research Group, Department of Botany, Faculty of Science and Agriculture, University of Fort Hare
  • Amidou Samie Department of Microbiology, University of Venda, Thohoyandou
  • Roland N Ndip Microbial Pathogenicity and Molecular Epidemiology Research Group, Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Science and Agriculture, University of Fort Hare and Department of Biochemistry and Microbiology, Faculty of Science, University of Buea, Buea

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/jhpn.v29i5.8897

Keywords:

Acetone, Antibiotic resistance, Combretum molle, Crude extracts, Helicobacter pylori, Microbial sensitivity tests, Minimum inhibitory concentration, South Africa

Abstract

Infection with Helicobacter pylori is strongly associated with a number of gastroduodenal pathologies. Antimicrobial resistance to commonly-used drugs has generated a considerable interest in the search for novel therapeutic compounds from medicinal plants. As an ongoing effort of this search, the susceptibility of 32 clinical strains of H. pylori and a reference strain—NCTC 11,638—was evaluated against five solvent extracts of Combretum molle, a plant widely used for the treatment of gastric ulcers and other stomach-related morbidities in South Africa. The extracts were screened for activity by the agar-well diffusion method, and the most active one of them was tested against the same strains by micro-broth dilution and time kill assays. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were included in these experiments as positive control antibiotics. The solvent extracts all demonstrated anti-H. pylori activity with zone diameters of inhibition between 0 and 38 mm. The most potent anti-H. pylori activity was demonstrated by the acetone extract, to which 87.5% of the clinical strains were susceptible. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90) values for this extract ranged from 1.25 to 5.0 mg/mL while those for amoxicillin and metronidazole ranged from 0.001 to 0.94 mg/mL and from 0.004 to 5.0 mg/mL respectively. The acetone extract was highly bactericidal at a concentration of 2.5 and 5.0 mg/mL, with complete elimination of the test organisms in 24 hours. Its inhibitory activity was better than that of metronidazole (p<0.05) as opposed to amoxicillin (p<0.05). The results demonstrate that C. molle may contain therapeutically-useful compounds against H. pylori, which are mostly concentrated in the acetone extract.

Key words: Acetone; Antibiotic resistance; Combretum molle; Crude extracts; Helicobacter pylori; Microbial sensitivity tests; Minimum inhibitory concentration; South Africa

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3329/jhpn.v29i5.8897

JHPN 2011; 29(5): 438-445

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How to Cite

Njume, C., Afolayan, A. J., Samie, A., & Ndip, R. N. (2011). Inhibitory and Bactericidal Potential of Crude Acetone Extracts of <i>Combretum molle</i> (Combretaceae) on Drug-resistant Strains of <i>Helicobacter pylori</i>. Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition, 29(5), 438–445. https://doi.org/10.3329/jhpn.v29i5.8897

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Original Papers