Directing Diarrhoeal Disease Research towards Disease-burden Reduction

Authors

  • Margaret Kosek Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore MD
  • Claudio F Lanata Instituto de Investigación Nutricional, Lima
  • Robert E Black Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore MD
  • Damian G Walker Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore MD
  • John D Snyder Department of Pediatrics, UCSF School of Medicine, San Francisco, CA
  • Mohammed Abdus Salam ICDDR,B, GPO Box 128, Dhaka
  • Dilip Mahalanabis Society for Applied Studies, CF-198, Salt Lake, Sector 1, Kolkata 700 064, West Bengal
  • Olivier Fontaine Division of Child and Adolescent Health, World Health Organization, Geneva
  • Zulfiqar A Bhutta Aga Khan University, Karachi
  • Shinjini Bhatnagar All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi
  • Igor Rudan Croatian Centre for Global Health, University of Split Medical School

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.3329/jhpn.v27i3.3374

Keywords:

Child heath, Diarrhoeal diseases, Mortality, Priority setting, Medical research

Abstract

Despite gains in controlling mortality relating to diarrhoeal disease, the burden of disease remains unac­ceptably high. To refocus health research to target disease-burden reduction as the goal of research in child health, the Child Health and Nutrition Research Initiative developed a systematic strategy to rank health research options. This priority-setting exercise included listing of 46 competitive research options in diar­rhoeal disease and their critical and quantitative appraisal by 10 experts based on five criteria for research that reflect the ability of the research to be translated into interventions and achieved disease-burden re­duction. These criteria included the answerability of the research questions; the efficacy and effectiveness of the intervention resulting from the research; the maximal potential for disease-burden reduction of the interventions derived from the research; the affordability, deliverability, and sustainability of the intervention supported by the research; and the overall effect of the research-derived intervention on equity. Experts scored each research option independently to delineate the best investments for diarrhoeal disease control in the developing world to reduce the burden of disease by 2015. Priority scores obtained for health policy and systems research obtained eight of the top 10 rankings in overall scores, indicating that current invest­ments in health research are significantly different from those estimated to be the most effective in reduc­ing the global burden of diarrhoeal disease by 2015.

Key words: Child heath; Diarrhoeal diseases; Mortality; Priority setting; Medical research

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doi: 10.3329/jhpn.v27i3.3374

J Health Popul Nutr 2009 Jun;27(3):319-331

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Author Biographies

Margaret Kosek, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore MD

Dr. Margaret Kosek
Department of International Health
Jolns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health
Baltimore, MD 21205
USA
Email: mkosek@jhsph.edu

Claudio F Lanata, Instituto de Investigación Nutricional, Lima

Medical School, Peruvian University of Applied Sciences, Lima, Peru

Igor Rudan, Croatian Centre for Global Health, University of Split Medical School

Department of Public Health Sciences, University of Edinburgh Medical School, Scotland, UK

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How to Cite

Kosek, M., Lanata, C. F., Black, R. E., Walker, D. G., Snyder, J. D., Salam, M. A., Mahalanabis, D., Fontaine, O., Bhutta, Z. A., Bhatnagar, S., & Rudan, I. (2009). Directing Diarrhoeal Disease Research towards Disease-burden Reduction. Journal of Health, Population and Nutrition, 27(3), 319–331. https://doi.org/10.3329/jhpn.v27i3.3374

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Original Papers