Low Prevalence of Antibody to Hepatitis G Virus Among the Risk Groups and Healthy Population of Bangladesh

  • Mahmuda Siddiqua Dept. of Microbiology, Ibn Sina Medical college, Kallyanpur, Dhaka
  • A A Nawsher Bacteriologist, Microbiology Laboratory, Institute of Public Health, Dhaka
  • S Tabassum Chairman, Dept. of Virology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka
  • M N Islam Chairman, Dept. of Virology, Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Dhaka
Keywords: Hepatitis G virus (HGV), anti- HGV

Abstract

Hepatitis G virus (HGV) is a RNA virus, which was identified in 1995-1996 as a transfusion transmissible virus and is associated with acute or chronic hepatitis. The sero-prevalence of hepatitis G virus was evaluated among various risk groups and healthy controls from Bangladesh.

A total of 252 subjects comprising of Intra-venous drug users (n-40), commercial sex workers (n-30), multiply transfused patients (n-62), hemodialysis patients (n-30), anti HCV positive patients (n-30), anti HIV positive patients (n-30) and healthy population (n-30) were included in this study. Antibody to hepatitis G virus E-2 protein was detected in the serum by Enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The overall antibody prevalence of HGV was 3.2%. The highest prevalence (10%) was observed among commercial sex workers, followed by intra-venous drug users (5%). The lowest prevalence (3.3%) was observed among each of the groups of hemodialysis patients, anti-HCV positive patients and anti-HIV positive patients. Anti-HGV antibody was not detected among any subjects from the control group. Epidemiologic data indicate that HGV is prevalent in risk groups though at very low prevalence.

DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3329/bjmm.v4i2.10822

 

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.
Abstract
610
PDF
527
Published
2012-06-03
How to Cite
Siddiqua, M., Nawsher, A., Tabassum, S., & Islam, M. (2012). Low Prevalence of Antibody to Hepatitis G Virus Among the Risk Groups and Healthy Population of Bangladesh. Bangladesh Journal of Medical Microbiology, 4(2), 5-8. https://doi.org/10.3329/bjmm.v4i2.10822
Section
Original Articles